Grilled Catfish with Warm Street Corn Salad

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I grew up eating catfish—have always loved it for its sweet, mild flavor and buttery texture. And so I’m thrilled to be working in partnership with The Catfish Institute to promote U.S. Farm-Raised Catfish. Besides the fact that it’s always a guaranteed hit with my kids, I love U.S. Farm-Raised Catfish because it’s a sustainable choice I can feel good about: It gets a best choice/green designation from Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program. 

In the following recipe that I created for this partnership, I grill spice-rubbed catfish fillets to give them a robust, slightly smoky flavor. And I pair these moist fillets with a warm, grilled corn salad based on my love of elote (Mexican street corn). It’s a friendly combo of buttery-rich fish and crunchy-sweet corn that’s brought together under a bright, herby sauce that’s basically a simplified version of chimichurri. This is family-friendly cooking that’s just special enough for company, too.

Yield: 4 servings (serving size: 1 catfish fillet, about 1 1/4 cups salad, and 2 Tbsp. sauce)
Author:

Grilled Catfish with Warm Street Corn Salad

prep time: 20 Mcook time: 16 Mtotal time: 36 M
I love this dish! Grilled corn gets tossed with a little mayo (but not too much), lime juice, chili powder, scallions, and cotija cheese for my off-the-cob take on street corn. This warm, savory salad is then topped with a spice-rubbed grilled catfish fillet and a dollop of simplified chimichurri sauce. The textures are wonderful: tender fish, crunchy corn, and unctuous sauce. And the flavors? Oh my! Sweet corn, salty cheese, bright and herby sauce, and rich fish combine in beautiful harmony.

ingredients:

  • 1 medium garlic clove, peeled
  • 1 1/2 cups coarsely chopped cilantro stems and leaves
  • 6 Tbsp. canola oil, divided
  • 1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 1/2 tsp. kosher salt, divided
  • 1 1/2 tsp. grated lime zest, divided
  • 3 Tbsp. fresh lime juice, divided
  • 4 large ears shucked corn
  • 1 tsp. ground cumin
  • 1 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp. black pepper
  • 4 U.S. Farm-Raised Catfish Fillets
  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 tsp. chili powder
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced green onions
  • 4 oz. cotija cheese, crumbled (can substitute feta or queso fresco)
  • Lime wedges (optional)

instructions:

How to cook Grilled Catfish with Warm Street Corn Salad

  1. Preheat grill to medium-high heat.
  2. While grill heats, place garlic clove in a mini food processor; process until finely chopped. Add cilantro; process until finely chopped. With processor running, gradually add 1/4 cup oil until well blended. Add red pepper, 1/4 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon lime zest, and 1 tablespoon lime juice; pulse until combined. Set aside.
  3. Brush corn with 1 tablespoon oil. Place corn on grill rack; grill until lightly charred on all sides, turning occasionally, about 8 minutes. Remove from grill and cool slightly.
  4. Combine 3/4 teaspoon salt, cumin, garlic powder, and black pepper. Brush catfish fillets with remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Sprinkle evenly on both sides with spice mixture. Arrange catfish on oiled grill rack; grill until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork, about 3-4 minutes per side. Remove from grill and keep warm.
  5. Cut corn kernels off the cobs and place in a large bowl. Combine corn, mayonnaise, chili powder, remaining 1 teaspoon lime zest and 2 tablespoons lime juice, and remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt. Stir in green onions and cheese. Serve corn salad with catfish and sauce. Serve with lime wedges, if desired.
Created using The Recipes Generator

 

Smoky Spice-Rubbed Catfish with Peach-Tomato Salad

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*sponsored post*

I am so excited to partner with The Catfish Institute to promote the goodness of U.S. Farm-Raised Catfish. It’s a sustainable seafood option you can feel good about—it gets a “best choice” rating from Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program—and because of the way it’s farmed and fed, it has a reliably mild, buttery flavor every time. 

I grew up in Mississippi, where catfish was a mainstay. Back then, we typically had it fried—which is fantastic—but the mild, sweet flavor of U.S. Farm-Raised Catfish is versatile enough to shine with other cooking methods, too. Here, I’ve rubbed it with some robust spices and given it a turn on the grill with some wood chips for a wonderfully smoky flavor. And because the fish itself is so mild, it pairs fantastically with fruit, in this case a summery mixture of sweet cherry tomatoes and even sweeter peaches. It’s an elegant take on a family-friendly fish you should get to know a little better, especially if you’re working to get more fish into your diet.

Yield: 4 servings (serving size: 1 catfish fillet and about 3/4 cup salad)
Author:

Smoky Spice-Rubbed Catfish with Peach-Tomato Salad

prep time: 30 Mcook time: 10 Mtotal time: 40 M
A whiff of wood smoke amps up spice-rubbed catfish in this stunning summer recipe. The mild flavor of the fish pairs beautifully with the fruity, herby salad.

ingredients:

  • 1 cup oak, hickory, or pecan wood chips
  • 4 U.S. Farm-Raised Catfish Fillets
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
  • 3/4 teaspoon black pepper, divided
  • 1/4 cup slivered red onion
  • 1 1/2 cups halved cherry tomatoes
  • 1 1/2 cups thin peach wedges, cut in half crosswise
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons white wine vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons thinly sliced fresh basil
  • Basil sprigs (optional)

instructions:

How to cook Smoky Spice-Rubbed Catfish with Peach-Tomato Salad

  1. Soak wood chips in water for 30 minutes; drain. Meanwhile, prepare grill for indirect grilling, heating one side of grill to medium-high and leaving other side with no heat. Maintain heat at about 400°F.
  2. Brush tops of catfish fillets with 1 tablespoon oil. Combine garlic powder, paprika, cumin, 3/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper; rub tops of fillets with spice mixture.
  3. Add soaked wood chips to coals. Arrange fillets, spice side up, on oiled grill rack over unheated side of grill. Close lid and cook until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork, about 10 to 12 minutes.
  4. Meanwhile, rinse onion in cold water; pat dry. Combine onion, tomatoes, peaches, vinegar, remaining 1 tablespoon oil, remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt, and remaining 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Toss gently to coat. Add basil; toss gently to combine. Serve salad with fillets. Garnish with basil sprigs, if desired.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Shrimp and Vegetable Curry with Cauliflower Rice

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Yield: 4 servings (serving size: 3/4 cup cauliflower rice, 4 oz. shrimp, & 3/4 cup sauce)

Shrimp and Vegetable Curry with Cauliflower Rice

prep time: 8 minscook time: 12 minstotal time: 20 mins

How about a 20-minute dinner that tastes like it took an hour? That's loaded with vegetables, too? This recipe delivers all that and is mild enough—and creamy enough—to satisfy everyone at the table. My kids hugged me after eating this, and I'll take that as pretty darn high praise! Do take note that it's a bit of a splurge. Though the calories are low (under 400 calories), the saturated fat is on the high side; try to balance out the rest of your day with food that's lower in sat fat. I do think it's worth it to go full fat with the coconut milk here for the most satisfying, creamy texture. Just think of it as a splurge, something to enjoy every now and then. Or hell, maybe once a week! And don't forget to squeeze on a little lime juice before tucking in; it's the perfect finishing touch, brightening the whole bowl.

ingredients:

  • 2 Tbsp. canola oil, divided
  • 1 cup vertically sliced yellow onion
  • 1 medium zucchini, chopped
  • 5 garlic cloves, minced and divided
  • 1 Tbsp. red curry paste (I used Thai Kitchen)
  • 1 tsp. brown sugar
  • 2 tsp. fish sauce
  • 1 (13.6-oz.) can coconut milk (full-fat)
  • 1 lb. raw large shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 6 oz. fresh baby spinach
  • 1 lb. riced cauliflower (I used fresh, not frozen)
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro, plus more for garnish
  • Thinly sliced Fresno or red jalapeño peppers (optional)
  • Lime wedges

instructions:

  1. Heat a large skillet or sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add 1 tablespoon oil; swirl to coat. Add onion and zucchini; sauté 3 minutes. Add half of garlic; sauté 2 minutes. Add curry paste; cook 30 seconds, stirring constantly. Stir in sugar, fish sauce, and coconut milk; bring to a simmer.
  2. Add shrimp; cover and cook until shrimp are almost done, about 2 minutes. Add spinach; cover and cook until spinach wilts, about 2 minutes. Stir gently to combine.
  3. Meanwhile, heat another large skillet over medium-high heat. Add remaining 1 tablespoon oil; swirl to coat. Add cauliflower and remaining half of garlic; sauté until crisp-tender, about 4 to 5 minutes. Stir in chopped cilantro. Divide cauliflower rice evenly among 4 bowls; top evenly with shrimp and sauce. Top with Fresno/jalapeño slices and additional cilantro, if desired. Serve with lime wedges.

NOTES:

Calories 376; Fat 21g (sat 13g); Protein 33g; Carb 14g; Fiber 5g; Sugars 9g (added sugars 1g); Sodium 766mg
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Slow-Roasted Salmon with Orange-Olive Salsa

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Yield: 4 (serving size: 1 fillet and 1/4 cup salsa)

Slow-Roasted Salmon with Orange-Olive Salsa

This slow, gentle roasting technique might just become your new favorite way to cook salmon. The low heat (only 250°F) keeps the flesh super-unctuous and oily-rich, and pretty much assures you won’t overcook the fish. The accompanying salsa is the perfect partner, with its bright pop of juicy citrus and meaty bits of buttery Castelvetrano olives (can we all just agree that they’re the best olives?).

prep time: 20 minscook time: 20 minstotal time: 40 mins

ingredients

  • 4 (6-oz.) salmon fillets (I used skin-on, sustainable farmed salmon)
  • Cooking spray
  • 1/2 tsp. kosher salt, divided
  • 1/4 tsp. black pepper
  • 2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 2 navel oranges

  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped pitted Castelvetrano olives (about 16 olives)
  • 1/4 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • 2 Tbsp. slivered shallot or red onion
  • 1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper

instructions

  1. Let salmon fillets stand at room temperature for 20 to 30 minutes to take the chill off. Preheat oven to 250°F.

  2. Arrange fillets in an 11 x 7–inch baking dish coated with cooking spray. Sprinkle with 3/8 tsp. salt and black pepper. Drizzle evenly with 1 tablespoon oil.
  3. Grate 1/2 teaspoon zest from one of the oranges; set zest aside. Remove peel and all pith from both oranges; slice between membranes to remove orange sections. Place sections in a medium bowl. Hold orange membranes over salmon in baking dish, and squeeze juice over fillets.
  4. Bake fillets at 250°F for 20 to 25 minutes, to desired degree of doneness. (Mine were to my liking right at 20 minutes.)
  5. Meanwhile, add olives, parsley, shallot, red pepper, orange zest, remaining 1 tablespoon oil, and 1/8 teaspoon salt to orange sections; toss gently to combine. Serve salsa with salmon.

NOTES:

Calories 397; Fat 27g (sat 5g); Protein 27g; Carb 11g; Fiber 2g; Sugars 8g (added sugars 0g); Sodium 538mg
Created using The Recipes Generator
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OK, so maybe you’re not sold yet on this idea. Let me try to get you there… Have you ever bought some beautiful salmon fillets, anticipating that oily, silky, fatty-in-all-the-good-ways texture, only to overcook the fish (even slightly) so that the texture falls flat? Yeah, that won’t happen with this slow-roasting method. It cooks the fish ever so gently so that it never loses that buttery silkiness you crave.

This recipe is pretty simple—not too much technique to explain. The hardest part is maybe sectioning the orange?? But even that isn’t hard. Just cut away all the peel and pith, and then cut between the membranes to extract the sections. Like this:

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After you’ve removed all the sections, don’t toss the membranes just yet. Hold on to these guys—

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And squeeze them over the fillets in the baking dish, like so:

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Then bake for a short 20ish minutes, and you’ll be delighted by the results. No. More. Overcooked. Salmon. I mean, just look at this texture!

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